Graduate

  • Comparative Literature Graduate Pedagogy Seminar

    Teaching practicum required of departmental Ph.D. students concurrently teaching their first course at Princeton, and open to those from other literature departments. A range of topics is discussed, based upon the needs and experience of participants. These typically include: facilitating discussions, delivering lectures, grading papers, designing course syllabi, teaching with translations, language and writing instruction, technology in the classroom, developing a statement of teaching philosophy, and preparing a teaching portfolio.
  • Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Mimetic Faculties

    A seminar on ideas of the "mimetic faculty," as Walter Benjamin defined it: the capacity to perceive similarities and the "compulsion to become similar." Through close study of selected ancient, medieval and modern accounts of imitation, particularly in language and literature, we explore some of the promises and perils of becoming alike. Topics to be discussed include simile and likeness; the poetic syllogism; animal mimicry; ancient divinatory practices and their modern legacies; play; gesture; onomatopoeia; translation; homophony.
  • Introduction to Comparative Literature

    This seminar familiarizes students with some of the fundamental theoretical, philosophical, and interpretive works on the arts and techne of sense-making from which critical, literary, aesthetic, social and media theory continue to derive today. These include: Lessing's Laokoon; Hegel's Aesthetics; Saussure's Course in General Linguistics; Austin's How to Do Things with Words, and important essays Freud, Jakobson, and Spitzer
  • Asian Feminist Epistemologies: Theory and Embodiment

    Fissuring, doubling, and vanishing: The metaphors of feminisms are evocative of the visual, acoustic, and corporeal intensities permeating feminist interventions in political movement, philosophy, historiography, and film and media theory. Rather than a linear history of feminism in Asia, this seminar probes the changing "subject" of feminism(s) that is shaped by the geopolitical imaginaries of Asia and the West in the twentieth century.
  • Seminar in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature: Money in the 19C Novel

    The great innovation of literary fiction in the nineteenth century is to tell stories about money - how it is made, handled, invested and lost, how it weighs on the lives of rich people, poor people, women in search of husbands and young men in search of a position. These new themes arise just as writers themselves become able to earn money from their work. This course studies the money-plots of a selection of major European novels written between 1830 and 1890 alongside the changing economic status of the writers of novels in the same period.
  • Topics in German Intellectual History: Aesthetics and (Un)Freedom

    Do aesthetic practices harbor radical political potential, or have they been co-opted by the creative economy's imperative of relentless aesthetic innovation? This seminar explores a formative motif of German critical thought: the notion that some feature of art or aesthetics--the plenitude of aesthetic experience, the indeterminacy of aesthetic judgment, or unconstrained artistic form--prefigures political freedom.
  • Comparative Literature Graduate Pedagogy Seminar

    Teaching practicum required of departmental Ph.D. students concurrently teaching their first course at Princeton, and open to those from other literature departments. A range of topics is discussed, based upon the needs and experience of participants. These typically include: facilitating discussions, delivering lectures, grading papers, designing course syllabi, teaching with translations, language and writing instruction, technology in the classroom, developing a statement of teaching philosophy, and preparing a teaching portfolio.
  • Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Mimetic Faculties

    A seminar on ideas of the "mimetic faculty," as Walter Benjamin defined it: the capacity to perceive similarities and the "compulsion to become similar." Through close study of selected ancient, medieval and modern accounts of imitation, particularly in language and literature, we explore some of the promises and perils of becoming alike. Topics to be discussed include simile and likeness; the poetic syllogism; animal mimicry; ancient divinatory practices and their modern legacies; play; gesture; onomatopoeia; translation; homophony.

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