Graduate

  • Le Monde par la bande

    This course explores representations of the World and History in major bandes dessinées (or graphic novels) published in French from the 1930s to the present, and produced by authors of various backgrounds (French, Belgian, Italian, Jewish, Iranian). Informed by theoretical readings, discussions will address key aesthetical, political, and ethical issues, including Exoticism, Orientalism, (Post)colonialism, national and individual identity, as well as the theory of reception, to critically assess the fluctuations of these visions between fantasy and testimony.
  • Russia in Color

    Russia in Color investigates the application, evolution, and perception of color in art in (Soviet) Russia and emigration. This Princeton University Art Museum-based course explores the rich holdings of the museum, with a particular focus on Russian and European objects, as selections of artworks are paired with theoretical and cultural readings (media theory, philosophy, literature, science). The course includes a basic introduction to color terminology, guest lectures on the technologies and science of color printing, and a hands-on practicum in color mixing/pigmentation.
  • Topics in Russian Literature or Literary Theory: Authorship of the Body in the Anthropocene

    This seminar traces and examines the network of disparate stories that coalesce around bodies and health from the standpoint of narrative theory and the medical and environmental humanities. While the medical humanities show how authorship and authority over matters of illness, the body and the self are negotiated through a complex layering of narrative voices, ecocriticism reveals the enmeshment of the human body with the environment, value systems, and the distribution of knowledge.
  • Comparative Literature Graduate Pedagogy Seminar

    Teaching practicum required of departmental PhD students; open to those planning to teach in the spring semester, as well as to those concurrently teaching their first course at Princeton. A wide range of topics is discussed, based primarily upon the needs and experience of participants. These typically include: facilitating discussions, delivering lectures, grading papers, designing course syllabi, teaching with translations, using technology in the classroom, developing a statement of teaching philosophy, and preparing a teaching portfolio.
  • Introduction to Comparative Literature

    This seminar familiarizes students with some of the fundamental theoretical, philosophical, and interpretive works on the arts and techne of sense-making from which critical, literary, aesthetic, social and media theory continue to derive today. These include: Lessing's Laokoon; Hegel's Aesthetics; Saussure's Course in General Linguistics; Austin's How to Do Things with Words, and writings by Marx, Husserl, Derrida, Adorno, Freud, Jakobson, de Man, Spitzer, Auerbach.
  • Topics in Critical Theory: Comparative Literature Writing and Dissertation Colloquium

    The Writing and Dissertation Colloquium is a biweekly forum for graduate students in Comparative Literature to share works in progress with other graduate students. The seminar welcomes drafts of your prospectus, article, dissertation chapter, conference paper, exam statement and grant or fellowship proposal. Work is pre-circulated. The 90 minute sessions, done in conjunction with a rotating COM faculty member, are designed to offer written and oral feedback.
  • Ocean Media: Islanding, Space, Modernity

    This seminar explores the oceanic imaginary of space and the spatial technologies of islanding in the modern world-including the emergence of mega-ports, artificial islands, and the creation of political and economic zones of exception and military bases, with an emphasis on East and Southeast Asia. Posing islanding in the verb form, the readings deconstruct "island" as a natural geographic setting and probe its role in mediating the relations between individual and totality, insularity and world, mainland and periphery, land and sea, etc.
  • Topics in Medieval Literature: Reading the Roman de la Rose

    Arguably the single most influential vernacular work of the European Middle Ages, the Roman de la Rose presents itself as both an "art of love" and a "mirror of lovers," a prism that reflects the forms of medieval knowledge in unexpected ways. This seminar focuses on the two-part literary work in its literary, philosophical and theological contexts, as well as on its reception, with attention to the "quarrel of the Rose" to which it gave rise in fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

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