Graduate

  • Realism and Symbolism: Realism

    Realism is often rhetorically dismissed as naïve or uninteresting--'mere' realism. It comes accompanied by a list of strange but standard adjectives, from gritty to photographic to bourgeois to kitchen-sink. But realism has a rich and varied history of argument and experiment, above all in the nineteenth century (when the word was coined). Why represent reality, and which reality? What might be the pleasure or the point of it?

  • Comparative Literature Graduate Pedagogy Seminar

    Teaching practicum required of departmental PhD students and open only to those concurrently teaching in their first course at Princeton. A wide range of topics is discussed, based primarily upon the needs and experience of participants. These typically include: facilitating discussions, delivering lectures, grading papers, designing course syllabi, teaching with translations, using technology in the classroom, developing a statement of teaching philosophy, and preparing a teaching portfolio. Course leads to partial fulfillment of the McGraw Teaching Transcript.

  • Introduction to Comparative Literature

    This course traces the history of criticism in comparative literature along with recent critical developments such as surface reading, distant reading, affect theory, necropolitics, queer futurity, the new materialism, thing theory, biopolitics, ecocriticism, world literature, theory from the south, critiques of neoliberalism, and so on. The class will not embrace a mastery posture toward theory, but an instrumental one, aiming to assist graduate students in conceptualizing their particular projects within and against current debates.

  • Topics in Critical Theory: Comparative Literature Writing and Dissertation Colloquium

    The Writing and Dissertation Colloquium is a biweekly forum for graduate students in Comparative Literature to share works in progress with other graduate students. The seminar welcomes drafts of your prospectus, article, dissertation chapter, conference paper, exam statement and grant or fellowship proposal. Work is pre-circulated. The 90 minute sessions, done in conjunction with a rotating COM faculty member, are designed to offer written and oral feedback.

  • Realism and Symbolism: Realism

    Realism is often rhetorically dismissed as naïve or uninteresting--'mere' realism. It comes accompanied by a list of strange but standard adjectives, from gritty to photographic to bourgeois to kitchen-sink. But realism has a rich and varied history of argument and experiment, above all in the nineteenth century (when the word was coined). Why represent reality, and which reality? What might be the pleasure or the point of it?

  • Topics in Literature and Philosophy: The Commodity and the Concept

    This course explores major theoretical derivations of our working concepts of the commodity and the concept, before investigating the dynamic relation between them, including: the dependence of the former on the latter, the "transformation" of the latter into the former, the asymmetry of their mutual productivity, and the production of history from their relation. Readings in economic and conceptual philosophy and literary works in which these processes are narrated.

  • Topics in Critical Theory: Comparative Literature Writing and Dissertation Colloquium

    The Writing and Dissertation Colloquium is a biweekly forum for graduate students in Comparative Literature to share works in progress with other graduate students. The seminar welcomes drafts of your prospectus, article, dissertation chapter, conference paper, exam statement and grant or fellowship proposal. Work is pre-circulated. The 90 minute sessions, done in conjunction with a rotating COM faculty member, are designed to offer written and oral feedback.

  • The Eighteenth Century in Europe

    This year's topic is "Reading Characters: Clarissa in Context." The seminar will consider the development of the modern novel during the European Enlightenment as a narrative epistemology of character, through an intensive reading of Richardson's Clarissa.

  • Zen and Language

    Zen (Mandarin Chan) Buddhism claims not to subsist in language, but to rely on a separate transmission, yet the Zen canon is huge & language (both spoken & written) plays an indispensible role in Zen practice & in its engagement with the arts of East Asia. This course studies how language is characterized in Zen's traditions, its place in religious practice and how it has engaged with and made more complex considerations about language in the visual, literary and performing arts. East Asian language proficiency is NOT required for the course.

  • Topics in Literature and Philosophy: The Commodity and the Concept

    This course explores major theoretical derivations of our working concepts of the commodity and the concept, before investigating the dynamic relation between them, including: the dependence of the former on the latter, the "transformation" of the latter into the former, the asymmetry of their mutual productivity, and the production of history from their relation. Readings in economic and conceptual philosophy and literary works in which these processes are narrated.

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