Daniel Heller-Roazen

  • The Literature of Medieval Europe

    A seminar on medieval arts of love and the new forms of poetry and prose that are their expression. Our main focus will be literary works that present themselves as amorous inventions, from the Arabic and Hebrew poems of Islamic Spain to Juan Ruiz's Book of Good Love, from the troubadours and Minnesinger to the French, German and English romances of Lancelot, Tristan and Isolde, and Gawain. Yet we will also study medieval theoretical works by such authors as Ibn Hazm, Andreas Capellanus and Richard de Fournival.
  • Topics in Medieval Literature: Reading the Roman de la Rose

    Arguably the single most influential vernacular work of the European Middle Ages, the Roman de la Rose presents itself as both an "art of love" and a "mirror of lovers," a prism that reflects the forms of medieval knowledge in unexpected ways. This seminar focuses on the two-part literary work in its literary, philosophical and theological contexts, as well as on its reception, with attention to the "quarrel of the Rose" to which it gave rise in fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.
  • The Literature of Medieval Europe

    A seminar on medieval arts of love and the new forms of poetry and prose that are their expression. Our main focus will be literary works that present themselves as amorous inventions, from the Arabic and Hebrew poems of Islamic Spain to Juan Ruiz's Book of Good Love, from the troubadours and Minnesinger to the French, German and English romances of Lancelot, Tristan and Isolde, and Gawain. Yet we will also study medieval theoretical works by such authors as Ibn Hazm, Andreas Capellanus and Richard de Fournival.
  • Topics in Medieval Literature: Reading the Roman de la Rose

    Arguably the single most influential vernacular work of the European Middle Ages, the Roman de la Rose presents itself as both an "art of love" and a "mirror of lovers," a prism that reflects the forms of medieval knowledge in unexpected ways. This seminar focuses on the two-part literary work in its literary, philosophical and theological contexts, as well as on its reception, with attention to the "quarrel of the Rose" to which it gave rise in fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.
  • Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Sentences

    Sentences are objects crucial to several disciplines: grammar, logic, law, literature and philosophy. This seminar explores some of their conditions, limits and paradoxes. What distinguishes one kind of sentence from another? How can a command, for example, do things that a question cannot do? Why is it difficult, even impossible, to rephrase an exclamation as a statement? Reading works of literature, philosophy and linguistics, we focus on five basic sentence types: the question, exclamation, command, assertion and negation.
  • Introduction to Comparative Literature

    An introduction to poetics, its history and some of its fundamental works and terms, from antiquity to the medieval, modern and contemporary periods. Our readings are drawn from philosophy and linguistics as well as literature. Subjects to be discussed include the senses of poiesis; performance; mimesis; the definition of verse; the poetics of prose; the concept of the vernacular; poetics and rhetoric; the grammar of poetry; poetry and the inhuman.
  • Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Sentences

    Sentences are objects crucial to several disciplines: grammar, logic, law, literature and philosophy. This seminar explores some of their conditions, limits and paradoxes. What distinguishes one kind of sentence from another? How can a command, for example, do things that a question cannot do? Why is it difficult, even impossible, to rephrase an exclamation as a statement? Reading works of literature, philosophy and linguistics, we focus on five basic sentence types: the question, exclamation, command, assertion and negation.
  • Introduction to Comparative Literature

    An introduction to poetics, its history and some of its fundamental works and terms, from antiquity to the medieval, modern and contemporary periods. Our readings are drawn from philosophy and linguistics as well as literature. Subjects to be discussed include the senses of poiesis; performance; mimesis; the definition of verse; the poetics of prose; the concept of the vernacular; poetics and rhetoric; the grammar of poetry; poetry and the inhuman.
  • The Literature of Medieval Europe

    An introduction to medieval literature and the question of performative language in literature, linguistics, philosophy and theology. Works to be read include romance and lyric poetry from the French, German and English traditions, as well as selections from Scholastic philosophy, grammar and theology. We will also study some twentieth-century philosophical and linguistic accounts of speech acts. Topics to be discussed include lies, promises, oaths, baptisms, ritual speech and the structure of sacraments.

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