Daniel Heller-Roazen

  • The Literature of Medieval Europe

    An introduction to medieval literature and the question of performative language in literature, linguistics, philosophy and theology. Works to be read include romance and lyric poetry from the French, German and English traditions, as well as selections from Scholastic philosophy, grammar and theology. We will also study some twentieth-century philosophical and linguistic accounts of speech acts. Topics to be discussed include lies, promises, oaths, baptisms, ritual speech and the structure of sacraments.
  • Topics in Medieval Literature: Medieval Personhood

    This year's seminar explores the varieties of medieval personhood, with particular attention to limit cases: sovereigns, outcasts and outlaws, saints, monsters and hybrid creatures, the civilly and the truly dead, and ghosts. All texts are read in translation, though close study of the originals is encouraged wherever possible.
  • The Literature of Medieval Europe

    An introduction to medieval literature and the question of performative language in literature, linguistics, philosophy and theology. Works to be read include romance and lyric poetry from the French, German and English traditions, as well as selections from Scholastic philosophy, grammar and theology. We will also study some twentieth-century philosophical and linguistic accounts of speech acts. Topics to be discussed include lies, promises, oaths, baptisms, ritual speech and the structure of sacraments.

  • Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Missing Persons

    An exploration of literary, legal, linguistic, philosophical and psychoanalytic works featuring "persons" conceived as temporarily, permanently, and structurally absent. Topics to be considered include missing persons in the law; civil death; the legal status of the unborn and the corpse; ghosts; the Freudian "Id"; the existential "One"; social and linguistic "non-persons"; sexual difference and non-gendered persons.

  • Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Negations

    An exploration of some of the domains of writing and thought in which terms and ideas of negation acquire a crucial importance. Subjects that may be discussed include the grammar of negation in languages; logical treatments of negation; psychoanalytic concepts of negation, repression and disavowal; the aesthetics of <i>je ne sais quoi</i>; the idea of the <i>non-finito</i> in art; negative theology.

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