Erin Yu-Tien Huang

  • Chinese Cinemas

    This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese cinemas in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. From postwar musicals and pan-Asian blockbusters, to new wave avant-garde films and experimental documentaries, the diversity of Chinese cinemas reflects cinema's relations to global capitalism, Asia's democratization movements, financial crises, and the arrival of (post)socialism. Creating urban nomads, songstresses, daydreamers, travelers, and terrorists, Chinese cinemas put on full display the forces of globalization in shaping the aesthetics and politics of film.
  • Dangerous Bodies: Cross-Dressing, Asia, Transgression

    This course examines "dangerous bodies" - bodies that transgress existing gender and racial norms in Chinese and Sinophone cultures. Situated at the intersection of literary, film, performance, gender and ethnic studies, this course provides an introduction to the shifting social meanings of the body in relation to historical masculinity, femininity, and Chineseness.
  • Urban Horror Cinema: Asian Cities Crisis

    This course examines "urban horror" and "capitalism" as the cinematic motifs in contemporary East and Southeast Asian films. From Beijing to Hong Kong, and Singapore to Inner Mongolia, Asian cities are harboring urban imaginations that challenge existing human comprehension.
  • Seeing the Interior: Cinema, Media, Inverse Visuality

    From the invention of microscope, X-rays, to psychoanalysis and cinema, the world is increasingly mediated and constituted by visual technologies and new forms of visualities that collapse the boundaries between visibility and invisibility. This seminar explores visual representations of the "interior" and their mediating roles in the historical and social processes of colonialism, infrastructural revolution, (post-)socialism, and global capitalism in the East Asian and global context.
  • Urban Horror Cinema: Asian Cities Crisis

    This course examines "urban horror" and "capitalism" as the cinematic motifs in contemporary East and Southeast Asian films. From Beijing to Hong Kong, and Singapore to Inner Mongolia, Asian cities are harboring urban imaginations that challenge existing human comprehension.
  • Seeing the Interior: Cinema, Media, Inverse Visuality

    From the invention of microscope, X-rays, to psychoanalysis and cinema, the world is increasingly mediated and constituted by visual technologies and new forms of visualities that collapse the boundaries between visibility and invisibility. This seminar explores visual representations of the "interior" and their mediating roles in the historical and social processes of colonialism, infrastructural revolution, (post-)socialism, and global capitalism in the East Asian and global context.
  • Dangerous Bodies: Cross-Dressing, Asia, Transgression

    This course examines "dangerous bodies" - bodies that transgress existing gender and racial norms in Chinese and Sinophone cultures. Situated at the intersection of literary, film, performance, gender and ethnic studies, this course provides an introduction to the shifting social meanings of the body in relation to historical masculinity, femininity, and Chineseness.

  • East Asian Humanities II: Traditions and Transformations

    This course begins roughly around the fourteenth century and covers the arts, history, music, literature, popular culture, film and media in transnational China, Japan, and Korea up to the contemporary period. Special focus will be given to the question of modernity in East Asia. Lectures are given by specialists in the departments of East Asian Studies, Comparative Literature, Music, and Art and Archaeology. This is the second half of a two-semester sequence introducing the humanities in East Asia.

  • Spectral Thinking in Modern Chinese Literature and Film

    'Spectral Thinking' examines what may be characterized as supernatural, fantastic, and anomalous in twentieth century and contemporary Chinese film and literature. Through the lens of spectral thinking, this course introduces a modern Chinese history replete with phantoms, dreams, and nightmares of the modern era.

  • Spectral Thinking in Modern Chinese Literature and Film

    'Spectral Thinking' examines what may be characterized as supernatural, fantastic, and anomalous in twentieth century and contemporary Chinese film and literature. Through the lens of spectral thinking, this course introduces a modern Chinese history replete with phantoms, dreams, and nightmares of the modern era.

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