Lital Levy

  • Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Culture and Ethics

    This course investigates the question of ethics and culture in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. What is the relationship between culture and ethics? How does the conflict permeate everyday life, and how do Palestinian and Israeli artists, writers and filmmakers respond? How have they pushed aesthetic and ethical limits in representing extreme violence and loss? How does the cultural imagination transgress borders or challenge one-sided understandings of responsibility?
  • Comparative Poetics of Passing: Race, Ethnicity, Sexuality

    The expansion of race theory from the Americas into the global scene invites a cross-cultural approach to the fluidity of identity. This seminar investigates fiction and film from the African American, Jewish American, LGBTQ, and Israeli-Palestinian contexts to broadly explore how society constructs and deconstructs race, ethnicity, and gender. It focuses on representations of passing and reverse passing as well as doubled/split identities for a wide-ranging, comparative discussion of the political and the psychological dynamics of identity and selfhood.
  • Introduction to Jewish Cultures

    This introductory course focuses on the global diversity and the cultural syncretism of Jewish experience from the Bible to the present. It examines how Jewish culture has emerged through the interaction of Jews and non-Jews, engaging a wide spectrum of cultures throughout the Jewish world, and following representations of key issues such as sexuality, suffering, or mystical experience in different contexts and eras. Topics include Bible and Talmud, kabbalah, Zionism, Jewish cinema, music, food, modern literature, and comics. All readings and films are in English.
  • Politics and Society in the Arabic Novel and Film

    This course examines how Arab writers and filmmakers represent social and political issues such as the aftermath of colonization, labor migration, civil war, authoritarianism, and women's rights. It covers novels and film from Egypt, the Sudan, Lebanon, Palestine, Libya, Algeria, Syria, and Iraq, on the Syrian civil war, the Arab Spring, the Lebanese Civil War, the Palestinian struggle, Islamic fundamentalism, and Ba'athist Iraq. The course will also address the role of Arabic literature and film as social and political critique. All readings and films are in English translation.
  • Introduction to Jewish Cultures

    This introductory course focuses on the global diversity and the cultural syncretism of Jewish experience from the Bible to the present. It examines how Jewish culture has emerged through the interaction of Jews and non-Jews, engaging a wide spectrum of cultures throughout the Jewish world, and following representations of key issues such as sexuality, suffering, or mystical experience in different contexts and eras. Topics include Bible and Talmud, kabbalah, Zionism, Jewish cinema, music, food, modern literature, and comics. All readings and films are in English.
  • Politics and Society in the Arabic Novel and Film

    This course examines how Arab writers and filmmakers represent social and political issues such as the aftermath of colonization, labor migration, civil war, authoritarianism, and women's rights. It covers novels and film from Egypt, the Sudan, Lebanon, Palestine, Libya, Algeria, Syria, and Iraq, on the Syrian civil war, the Arab Spring, the Lebanese Civil War, the Palestinian struggle, Islamic fundamentalism, and Ba'athist Iraq. The course will also address the role of Arabic literature and film as social and political critique. All readings and films are in English translation.
  • Modern Hebrew Literature: A Historical Introduction

    This course follows the development of modern Hebrew prose in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. How was Hebrew refashioned from a liturgical to a modern literary language capable of narrating novels and conveying contemporary dialogue? Who were the revolutionary writers who accomplished this feat and what ideological struggles accompanied it?
  • Introduction to Jewish Cultures

    This introductory course focuses on the cultural syncretism and the global diversity of Jewish experience. It provides a comparative understanding of Jewish culture from antiquity to the present, examining how Jewish culture has emerged through the interaction of Jews and non-Jews, engaging a wide spectrum of cultures throughout the Jewish world, and following representations of key issues such as sexuality or the existence of God in different eras.

  • Topics in Critical Theory: Comparative Literature Writing and Dissertation Colloquium

    The Writing and Dissertation Colloquium is a biweekly forum for graduate students in Comparative Literature to share works in progress with other graduate students. The seminar welcomes drafts of your prospectus, article, dissertation chapter, conference paper, exam statement and grant or fellowship proposal. Work is pre-circulated. The 90 minute sessions, done in conjunction with a rotating COM faculty member, are designed to offer written and oral feedback.

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