Thomas William Hare

  • Classical Japanese Theater

    In this course we study four major forms of pre-modern Japanese drama: Noh, Kyogen, Kabuki and Bunraku. These dramatic forms have close relation to other aspects of Japanese culture, especially literature and music, and give voice to a wide range of human experience within the context of an intricately articulated body of conventions, with surprises. No knowledge of Japanese is expected. We will devote a significant portion of our time to studying performances on DVD and/or VHS.

  • Love and Death on the Japanese Stage

    Love and death are staples of Japanese stage, as in many dramatic traditions. In traditional Japan, they take on a particular coloring, in response to specific cultural conditions and because of long-established and sophisticated conventions of performance. In this course we study how those conventions of performance depict and articulate these fundamental experiences of life. We study the ways gender and religion influence ideas about love and death, and how political change is reflected in dramatic performance.

  • Classical Japanese Theater

    In this course we study four major forms of pre-modern Japanese drama: Noh, Kyogen, Kabuki and Bunraku. These dramatic forms have close relation to other aspects of Japanese culture, especially literature and music, and give voice to a wide range of human experience within the context of an intricately articulated body of conventions, with surprises. No knowledge of Japanese is expected. We will devote a significant portion of our time to studying performances on DVD and/or VHS.

  • Love and Death on the Japanese Stage

    Love and death are staples of Japanese stage, as in many dramatic traditions. In traditional Japan, they take on a particular coloring, in response to specific cultural conditions and because of long-established and sophisticated conventions of performance. In this course we study how those conventions of performance depict and articulate these fundamental experiences of life. We study the ways gender and religion influence ideas about love and death, and how political change is reflected in dramatic performance.

  • Writing, with Pictures: Logographs, Texts and the Image

    Non-alphabetic writing was once considered a primitive stage from which "proper" i.e., phonetically-based writing systems evolved, displacing such "picture writing." This course studies writing from the perspective of such "ideographic" or logographic systems and returns to the question of how writing and the image continue to interact even in putatively phonetic written contexts.

  • Zen and Language

    Zen (Mandarin Chan) Buddhism claims not to subsist in language, but to rely on a separate transmission, yet the Zen canon is huge & language (both spoken & written) plays an indispensible role in Zen practice & in its engagement with the arts of East Asia. This course studies how language is characterized in Zen's traditions, its place in religious practice and how it has engaged with and made more complex considerations about language in the visual, literary and performing arts. East Asian language proficiency is NOT required for the course.

  • Writing, with Pictures: Logographs, Texts and the Image

    Non-alphabetic writing was once considered a primitive stage from which "proper" i.e., phonetically-based writing systems evolved, displacing such "picture writing." This course studies writing from the perspective of such "ideographic" or logographic systems and returns to the question of how writing and the image continue to interact even in putatively phonetic written contexts.

  • Zen and Language

    Zen (Mandarin Chan) Buddhism claims not to subsist in language, but to rely on a separate transmission, yet the Zen canon is huge & language (both spoken & written) plays an indispensible role in Zen practice & in its engagement with the arts of East Asia. This course studies how language is characterized in Zen's traditions, its place in religious practice and how it has engaged with and made more complex considerations about language in the visual, literary and performing arts. East Asian language proficiency is NOT required for the course.

  • Classical Japanese Theater

    In this course we study four major forms of pre-modern Japanese drama: Noh, Kyogen, Kabuki and Bunraku. These dramatic forms have close relation to other aspects of Japanese culture, especially literature and music, and give voice to a wide range of human experience within the context of an intricately articulated body of conventions, with surprises. No knowledge of Japanese is expected. We will devote a significant portion of our time to studying performances on DVD and/or VHS.

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