English

  • The Bible as Literature

    This course will study what it means to read the Bible in a literary way: what literary devices does it contain, and how has it influenced the way we read literature today? What new patterns and meanings emerge?
  • Special Studies in Modernism: Exilic Time

    Exile by definition entails a wrenching relocation in space, but exile also can disarrange, by fracturing, the sense of time. This course examines the double time of exilic life, what Nabokov calls physical time and spiritual time. Physical time accentuates the pangs of exile--inhabiting a present so radically different from the familiar but quickly receding the past. Spiritual time, in which memory seek refuge, is more mobile and more creative; it can recall a vanished world and even project a future return.
  • Criticism and Theory: Fredric Jameson

    Fredric Jameson is perhaps the most important theorist of our age with a global readership across all disciplines in the humanities for decades on end. In this graduate course, we discuss his entire body of work, appreciating the range and depth of his thought. I invite Jameson to teleconference into our seminar at least once, and I welcome interested students to do some advanced reading to acquaint themselves with his ideas.
  • The Bible as Literature

    This course will study what it means to read the Bible in a literary way: what literary devices does it contain, and how has it influenced the way we read literature today? What new patterns and meanings emerge?
  • Special Studies in Modernism: Exilic Time

    Exile by definition entails a wrenching relocation in space, but exile also can disarrange, by fracturing, the sense of time. This course examines the double time of exilic life, what Nabokov calls physical time and spiritual time. Physical time accentuates the pangs of exile--inhabiting a present so radically different from the familiar but quickly receding the past. Spiritual time, in which memory seek refuge, is more mobile and more creative; it can recall a vanished world and even project a future return.
  • Criticism and Theory: Fredric Jameson

    Fredric Jameson is perhaps the most important theorist of our age with a global readership across all disciplines in the humanities for decades on end. In this graduate course, we discuss his entire body of work, appreciating the range and depth of his thought. I invite Jameson to teleconference into our seminar at least once, and I welcome interested students to do some advanced reading to acquaint themselves with his ideas.
  • Problems in Literary Study: The Postcolonial Family Romance

    The goal of this course is to rethink the project of the novel in the colonial and postcolonial world by shifting emphasis from the mimetic model of desire to what Freud called the family romance, the search for alternative worlds in the social order.
  • Problems in Literary Study: The Postcolonial Family Romance

    The goal of this course is to rethink the project of the novel in the colonial and postcolonial world by shifting emphasis from the mimetic model of desire to what Freud called the family romance, the search for alternative worlds in the social order.
  • Modern Drama I

    A study of major plays by Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekov, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett and others. Artists who revolutionized the stage by transforming it into a venue for avant-garde social, political, psychological, artistic and metaphysical thought, creating the theatre we know today.
  • Bollywood Cinema

    Bollywood generates more films each year than other global film industries, circulating films across Africa, Asia, and beyond. What are the dominant trends and genres of popular South Asian cinema since independence? We will assume a capacious meaning of "Bollywood" as a global phenomenon. Course topics include the recent resurgence of Pakistani film industry as well as "Third Cinema," against which the popular is often defined in studies of postcolonial cinema. Course topics include melodrama, the popular, translation, diaspora, migration, nationalism and affect.

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