English

  • Topics in Literature and Ethics: Modern Evil

    This is a course on the problem of evil in the modern world as it is represented in works of literature and film. What is the nature of evil and how is it imagined? How can the noble ideas that define the modern world--justice and human rights, for example--be reconciled
  • Topics in Postcolonial Literature: Postcolonial Cities

    Addresses the literature of several cities that have been central in shaping the modern imagination: Bombay, Cairo, Lagos, and Johannesburg. It will explore how the emergence of these global cities has transformed the meaning of urban landscapes and their representation in literature. The course will also examine how migrant writers from Africa and the Caribbean have transformed old cities such as London and New York. How does the city shape the form of writing? How does language itself transform the meaning of the urban experience?
  • Bollywood Cinema

    Bollywood generates more films each year than other global film industries, circulating films across Africa, Asia, and beyond. What are the dominant trends and genres of popular South Asian cinema since independence? We will assume a capacious meaning of "Bollywood" as a global phenomenon. Course topics include the recent resurgence of Pakistani film industry as well as "Third Cinema," against which the popular is often defined in studies of postcolonial cinema. Course topics include melodrama, the popular, translation, diaspora, migration, nationalism and affect.
  • Special Studies in Modernism: Modernist Portraiture

    This course traces the emergence of the distinctly "modern" portrait, including, of course, the self-portrait, from its beginnings in the mid-nineteen century to the present day. We are particularly concerned with analyzing how this radical shift in the way a novel or a poem "framed" and depicted its central subject depended on corresponding stylistic revolutions in painting and developing technologies in photography & film.
  • Early 17th Century: Polyglot Poetics: Transnationalism, Gender and Literature

    On the interaction of different vernacular literatures in early modern Europe in times of turbulent state formation, confessional difference and transcontinental imperial expansion. Through the careers of diplomats, exiles, actors, conquistadors and other travelers, we uncover the deep mutual interest of authors in their neighbors' writings, a story obscured by emphasis upon classical antiquity's continuing hold on learning.

  • World Drama

    This course is a survey of classical and modern drama from Africa, China, India, Japan, and Latin America. Topics will include Noh and Kabuki, Beijing Opera, Sanskrit theater, Nigerian masquerades and a variety of selections from the rich modern Indian and Latin American canons. There may be trips to NYC or locally to see new theater works.

  • The Bible as Literature

    This course will study what it means to read the Bible in a literary way: what literary devices does it contain, and how has it influenced the way we read literature today? What new patterns and meanings emerge?

  • New Diasporas: Black British Literature

    This is a course on the dynamic body of works produced by migrants and descendants of migrants from Africa and the Caribbean in Britain since the 1950s. How has the migrant experience transformed the British cultural landscape after the end of an empire? What does it mean to be British and Black? How have migrant writers created new aesthetic forms to respond to the meaning of postcolonial Britishness? How does writing function as a mode of imagining alternative spaces of belonging?

  • World Drama

    This course is a survey of classical and modern drama from Africa, China, India, Japan, and Latin America. Topics will include Noh and Kabuki, Beijing Opera, Sanskrit theater, Nigerian masquerades and a variety of selections from the rich modern Indian and Latin American canons. There may be trips to NYC or locally to see new theater works.

  • Problems in Literary Study: Postcolonial Heterotopias

    This course invites rethinking established theories of postcolonial literature outside the national allegory, modern subjectivity, & the politics of identity. Focusing on "minor" works of major postcolonial writers, the course seeks to understand the postcolonial imaginary beyond the utopia of community, the dystopia of postmodern angst, & the romance of individual life.

Pages

Subscribe to English