French

  • Laughing with the Other: Humor and Alterity in French and Francophone Modern Literature and Culture

    From colonization to civil war, Francophone Africa and the Caribbean are little understood beyond such grave issues of urgency and violence. However, no society, its people or their realities are homogenously desolate. Through the study of novels, graphic novels, films and stand-up, this course explores the place of humor in French literature and culture of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean.
  • The Literature of Environmental Disaster

    The Anthropocene names, paradoxically, the simultaneous advent of human mastery over nature and the epoch of runaway climate change. The challenges posed by our very success, from air pollution and flooding to nuclear fallout and plagues, from agribusiness to petro-imperialism, suggest the urgency of rethinking our relationship to nature beyond mere technical fixes. Literature sheds a unique light on how distinct cultures and individuals live this rapport.
  • Seminar in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature: Money in the 19C Novel

    The great innovation of literary fiction in the nineteenth century is to tell stories about money - how it is made, handled, invested and lost, how it weighs on the lives of rich people, poor people, women in search of husbands and young men in search of a position. These new themes arise just as writers themselves become able to earn money from their work. This course studies the money-plots of a selection of major European novels written between 1830 and 1890 alongside the changing economic status of the writers of novels in the same period.
  • Laughing with the Other: Humor and Alterity in French and Francophone Modern Literature and Culture

    From colonization to civil war, Francophone Africa and the Caribbean are little understood beyond such grave issues of urgency and violence. However, no society, its people or their realities are homogenously desolate. Through the study of novels, graphic novels, films and stand-up, this course explores the place of humor in French literature and culture of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean.
  • The Literature of Environmental Disaster

    The Anthropocene names, paradoxically, the simultaneous advent of human mastery over nature and the epoch of runaway climate change. The challenges posed by our very success, from air pollution and flooding to nuclear fallout and plagues, from agribusiness to petro-imperialism, suggest the urgency of rethinking our relationship to nature beyond mere technical fixes. Literature sheds a unique light on how distinct cultures and individuals live this rapport.
  • Seminar in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature: Money in the 19C Novel

    The great innovation of literary fiction in the nineteenth century is to tell stories about money - how it is made, handled, invested and lost, how it weighs on the lives of rich people, poor people, women in search of husbands and young men in search of a position. These new themes arise just as writers themselves become able to earn money from their work. This course studies the money-plots of a selection of major European novels written between 1830 and 1890 alongside the changing economic status of the writers of novels in the same period.
  • Seminar in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature: Writing the People in 19thC France

    What is the people? Much of nineteenth-century literature is an effort to confront this urgent political question after the Revolution, and to give shape and voice to this amorphous new sovereign. At once ubiquitous and intangible, the people is an unsettling power that modern writing seeks to name, express, silence, or shape. This course examines some landmark novels (by Hugo, les Goncourt, Sand, and Zola) and social analysis (by reformers, hygienists, and intellectuals) at the crossroads between politics and aesthetics. Critical texts by Marx, Chevalier, Rancière, Foucault, T.J.
  • The Contemporary

    What does it mean to be contemporary? How does one truly inhabit the present? Through theoretical texts and examples in literature and film, this course explores the ways in which thinkers, writers, and filmmakers have crafted themselves as agents of actualité.
  • Seminar in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature: Writing the People in 19thC France

    What is the people? Much of nineteenth-century literature is an effort to confront this urgent political question after the Revolution, and to give shape and voice to this amorphous new sovereign. At once ubiquitous and intangible, the people is an unsettling power that modern writing seeks to name, express, silence, or shape. This course examines some landmark novels (by Hugo, les Goncourt, Sand, and Zola) and social analysis (by reformers, hygienists, and intellectuals) at the crossroads between politics and aesthetics. Critical texts by Marx, Chevalier, Rancière, Foucault, T.J.
  • The Contemporary

    What does it mean to be contemporary? How does one truly inhabit the present? Through theoretical texts and examples in literature and film, this course explores the ways in which thinkers, writers, and filmmakers have crafted themselves as agents of actualité.

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