Humanistic Studies

  • East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations

    An introduction to the literature, art, religion and philosophy of China, Japan and Korea from antiquity to ca. 1400. Readings focus on primary texts in translation and are complemented by museum visits and supplementary materials on the course website. The course aims to allow students to explore the unique aspects of East Asian civilizations and the connections between them through an interactive web-based platform, in which assignments are integrated with the texts and media on the website. No prior knowledge of working with digital media is required.
  • Introduction to Digital Humanities

    This course will introduce students to debates and approaches in the Digital Humanities from a global perspective. We will consider the foundations of DH while also discussing concerns involving access, maintenance, and care for projects over time in regions with physical restraints such as connectivity restrictions. On seminar days, we will work through theoretical concerns and explore the possibilities and limits of existing tools.
  • Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities: Persons, Selves, Fictions

    This seminar will explore notions of personhood and selfhood as they are dramatized in works of 19.- and 20.-c. European fiction, especially in texts that stage the formation of an "I" in relation to an other, and to a resistant social world. Attention will be paid to how these works thematize writing as a technique for what philosopher Ian Hacking calls "making up people." Readings from philosophy and psychoanalysis that address questions of personhood and selfhood in literature and culture (Nietzsche, Simmel, Foucault, Freud, Lacan).
  • East Asian Humanities II: Traditions and Transformations

    Second in the two-semester sequence on East Asian literary humanities, this course begins in the seventeenth century and covers a range of themes in the history, literature, and culture of Japan, Korea, and China until the contemporary period. Looking into the narratives of modernity, colonialism, urban culture, and war and disaster, we will see East Asia as a space for encounters, contestations, cultural currents and countercurrents. No knowledge of East Asian languages or history is required and first-year students are welcome to take the course.
  • East Asian Humanities II: Traditions and Transformations

    Second in the two-semester sequence on East Asian literary humanities, this course begins in the seventeenth century and covers a range of themes in the history, literature, and culture of Japan, Korea, and China until the contemporary period. Looking into the narratives of modernity, colonialism, urban culture, and war and disaster, we will see East Asia as a space for encounters, contestations, cultural currents and countercurrents. No knowledge of East Asian languages or history is required and first-year students are welcome to take the course.
  • East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations

    An introduction to the literature, art, religion and philosophy of China, Japan and Korea from antiquity to ca. 1400. Readings focus on primary texts in translation, complemented by museum visits and supplementary materials on the course website. The course aims to allow students to explore the unique aspects of East Asian civilizations and the connections between them through an interactive web-based platform, in which assignments are integrated with the texts and media on the website. No prior knowledge of working with digital media is required.
  • Freud and His Readers

    The seminar explores a wide selection of texts by Sigmund Freud, especially those that seem to illuminate the creative or poetic or fiction-making function of mind while reflecting on practices of reading as vital to Freud's own activities as both a psychoanalyst and a writer. A smaller selection of texts by Sandor Ferenczi, Jean Laplanche, and Jacques Lacan are addressed as commentary on fundamental Freudian concepts, and as interpretations of Freud's texts that themselves thematize reading.
  • East Asian Humanities I: The Classical Foundations

    An introduction to the literature, art, religion and philosophy of China, Japan and Korea from antiquity to ca. 1400. Readings focus on primary texts in translation, complemented by museum visits and supplementary materials on the course website. The course aims to allow students to explore the unique aspects of East Asian civilizations and the connections between them through an interactive web-based platform, in which assignments are integrated with the texts and media on the website. No prior knowledge of working with digital media is required.
  • Freud and His Readers

    The seminar explores a wide selection of texts by Sigmund Freud, especially those that seem to illuminate the creative or poetic or fiction-making function of mind while reflecting on practices of reading as vital to Freud's own activities as both a psychoanalyst and a writer. A smaller selection of texts by Sandor Ferenczi, Jean Laplanche, and Jacques Lacan are addressed as commentary on fundamental Freudian concepts, and as interpretations of Freud's texts that themselves thematize reading.
  • East Asian Humanities II: Traditions and Transformations

    Second in the two-semester sequence on East Asian literary humanities, this course begins in the seventeenth century and covers a range of themes in the history, literature, and culture of Japan, Korea, and China until the contemporary period. Looking into the narratives of modernity, colonialism, urban culture, and war and disaster, we will see East Asia as a space for encounters, contestations, cultural currents and countercurrents. No knowledge of East Asian languages or history is required and first-year students are welcome to take the course.

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