Courses

Spring 2023
Advanced Creative Writing (Literary Translation) (LA)
Subject associations
CWR 306 / COM 356 / TRA 314

Students will choose, early in the semester, one author to focus on in fiction, poetry, or drama, with the goal of arriving at a 20-25 page sample of the author's work. All work will be translated into English and discussed in a workshop format. Weekly readings will focus on the comparison of pre-existing translations as well as commentaries on the art and practice of literary translation.

Instructors
Jenny McPhee
Spring 2023
Caribbean Diasporas (CD or HA)
Subject associations
LAO 265 / COM 255 / LAS 265 / AAS 266

This course examines what it means to be Caribbean, or of Caribbean descent, in the diaspora- either the United States, England, and France due to their stake in colonizing the Caribbean in the quest for imperial power and modernity, and how Caribbean culture has been defined in historical and contemporary contexts through a survey of Caribbean diasporic literature. In this course students will learn how legacies of colonialism and modernity affect Caribbean populations and how they negotiate empire, identity, language, culture, and notions of home.

Instructors
Keishla Rivera-Lopez
Spring 2023
Chinese Cinemas (CD or LA)
Subject associations
EAS 236 / COM 228

This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese cinemas in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. From postwar musicals and pan-Asian blockbusters, to new wave avant-garde films and experimental documentaries, the diversity of Chinese cinemas reflects cinema's relations to global capitalism, Asia's democratization movements, financial crises, and the arrival of (post)socialism. Creating urban nomads, songstresses, daydreamers, travelers, and terrorists, Chinese cinemas put on full display the forces of globalization in shaping the aesthetics and politics of film. Selections broadly include popular commercial films to rare art house productions.

Instructors
Erin Y. Huang
Spring 2023
Communication and the Arts: The Battle of the Books: Culture Wars in Early Modern Europe (LA)
Subject associations
ECS 331 / HIS 430 / COM 317

This course will focus on a major intellectual controversy of the 17th and 18th centuries known as the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns. Through close readings of seminal texts we will address issues pertaining to the historical significance of the Quarrel, its sociopolitical implications, and the role it played in the cultural and scientific evolution of early modern Europe. We will approach the Quarrel as a critical moment in the prehistory of modernity that resulted in a redefinition of concepts such as mimesis and originality, tradition and innovation, decline and progress.

Instructors
Anthony T. Grafton
Spring 2023
Conflict and Culture (EM or LA)
Subject associations
COM 437

The age-old relationship between literature and war is fundamentally a problem of ethics. This course is centrally concerned with ethics and aesthetics: the ethics of war, the aesthetics of war literature and film, and the ethics of making art about war. It explores the triangulation of warfare, literature, and ethics in the 20th-21st centuries, approaching this relationship through multiple thematic frames and genres (poetry, fiction, film, photography, and critical essays), with texts drawn from a diverse array of world cultures. Topics include total war, memory and trauma, translation, partition, war and comics, and virtual warfare.

Instructors
Lital Levy
Spring 2023
Conversations: Jazz and Literature (LA)
Subject associations
COM 464 / HUM 464 / MUS 457 / ENG 464

Why have so many masters of verbal art relied on the stylistics and epistemologies of jazz musicians for the communication of experience and disruption of conventional concepts? We'll draw on musical recordings, live in-class performances by guest jazz artists, poetry, fiction, and recent debates in jazz studies, critical theory and Black studies. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students of literature and/or music are welcomed, but proficiency in both disciplines is NOT required. We will develop together techniques of close reading and listening. Optional performance component for music instrumentalists and vocalists.

Instructors
Maya Kronfeld
Spring 2023
Creative Writing (Literary Translation) (LA)
Subject associations
CWR 206 / TRA 206 / COM 215

Students will choose, early in the semester, one author to focus on in fiction, poetry, or drama, with the goal of arriving at a 20-25 page sample of the author's work. All work will be translated into English and discussed in a workshop format. Weekly readings will focus on the comparison of pre-existing translations as well as commentaries on the art and practice of literary translation.

Instructors
Jenny McPhee
Spring 2023
Early Modern Amsterdam: Tolerant Eminence and the Arts (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 448 / THR 448 / HUM 448 / COM 440

Inter-disciplinary class on early modern Amsterdam (1550-1720) when the city was at the center of the global economy and leading cultural center; home of Rembrandt and Spinoza (Descartes was nearby) and original figures like playwrights Bredero and Vondel, the ethicist engraver Coornhert, the political economist de la Court brothers and English traveling theater. We go from art to poetry, drama, philosophy and medicine. Spring Break is in Amsterdam with museum visits, guest talks and participation in recreation of traveling theater from the period.

Instructors
Nigel Smith
Spring 2023
False Confessions: The Birth of the First Person (LA)
Subject associations
COM 385 / MED 385

The course aims to trace the origins of the first person in the Western literary tradition through the lens of confession, both as discourse and sacrament. By examining a series of texts that date from the late 12th century till the late 14th century, the course will consider how authors staged (oftentimes false) confessions in a bid to test the relation between the first person and truth as well as to claim a novel authority for fiction. By pairing medieval literary and theological texts with contemporary criticism, the course will try to understand how this period paved the way for our understanding of the first person and its discourses.

Instructors
Max Matukhin
Spring 2023
Feminist Poetics and Politics in the Americas (1960s to the present)
Subject associations
COM 542 / GSS 542 / SPA 558 / LAS 512

This course aims to explore different forms that the question of liberation has taken in writings by women philosophers and poets whose work helped to create cultural and political movements in the U.S. and Latin America. Starting in the 1960s, it studies different philosophical concepts and poetic figures that have shaped the language of feminist struggles (intersectionality, care and the commons, reproductive justice, "feminicidal" violence, social reproduction). Readings include Gloria Anzaldúa, Angela Davis, Silvia Federici, Verónica Gago, Raquel Gutiérrez, Audre Lorde, Bety Ruth Lozano, Cristina Rivera Garza, among others.

Instructors
Susana Draper