Courses

Spring 2020

Practicing Translation
Academic work in disciplines across the humanities and humanistic social sciences are fueled in part by practices of translation, and many disciplines are moving toward a consideration of translation as scholarship in its own right. Yet few graduate students are trained practices of translation, either within their discipline or as an interdisciplinary node of intellectual engagement. This graduate translation workshop aims to help students from various departments hone a practice of translation that can stand on its own as a scholarly endeavor, while also deepening and enriching the other forms of research and writing in which they engage.
Instructors: Karen Renee Emmerich
Realism and Representation: Forms of Fiction
This seminar investigates pathbreaking "realist" fictions that, spurned in their own eras, are now considered "classics" indispensable to our understanding of literature. Looking closely at their heterodox use of descriptive and narrative modes incl. verbal tense, figural patterns (e.g. repetition, extended analogy, metonymy), non-"descript" speculative vocabulary, irony, embedding, and parataxis, alongside key theoretical works, we examine how these works apprehend "the real" in its relation to temporality, causality, historicity and historical reflection in general. Works ranging from Balzac and Flaubert to Dickens, Fitzgerald and Proust.
Instructors: Claudia Joan Brodsky
Realism and Representation: Forms of Fiction
This seminar will investigate how literary authors use language both to create a sense of "the real" and to question what "the real" may be. Looking closely at forms of description and narration including verbal tense, figural patterns (such as repetition, simile and metonymy), vocabulary, voice, irony, and grammatical construction and syntax, we will study some of extraordinarily complex ways fictions generically termed "realist" bring about an "effect" or apprehension of the real we could not otherwise perceive, including its relation to temporality, causality, historicity and historical reflection in general.
Instructors: Claudia Joan Brodsky
Seminar in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature: Writing the People in 19thC France
What is the people? Much of nineteenth-century literature is an effort to confront this urgent political question after the Revolution, and to give shape and voice to this amorphous new sovereign. At once ubiquitous and intangible, the people is an unsettling power that modern writing seeks to name, express, silence, or shape. This course examines some landmark novels (by Hugo, les Goncourt, Sand, and Zola) and social analysis (by reformers, hygienists, and intellectuals) at the crossroads between politics and aesthetics. Critical texts by Marx, Chevalier, Rancière, Foucault, T.J. Clark, Lefort, and Rosanvallon.
Instructors: Göran Magnus Blix
Seminar in 19th- and 20th-Century French Literature: Writing the People in 19thC France
What is the people? Much of nineteenth-century literature is an effort to confront this urgent political question after the Revolution, and to give shape and voice to this amorphous new sovereign. At once ubiquitous and intangible, the people is an unsettling power that modern writing seeks to name, express, silence, or shape. This course examines some landmark novels (by Hugo, les Goncourt, Sand, and Zola) and social analysis (by reformers, hygienists, and intellectuals) at the crossroads between politics and aesthetics. Critical texts by Marx, Chevalier, Rancière, Foucault, T.J. Clark, Lefort, and Rosanvallon.
Instructors: Göran Magnus Blix
South Asian American Literature and Film
This course examines literature and film by South Asians in North America. Students will gain perspective on the experiences of immigration and diaspora through the themes of identity, memory, solidarity, and resistance. From early Sikh migration to the American West Coast, to Muslim identity in a post 9/11 world, how can South Asian American stories be read as symbolic of the American experience of gender, class, religion, and ethnicity more broadly? Students will hone their skills in reading primary materials, analyzing them within context, writing persuasively, and speaking clearly.
Instructors: Sadaf Jaffer
South Asian American Literature and Film
This course examines literature and film by South Asians in North America. Students will gain perspective on the experiences of immigration and diaspora through the themes of identity, memory, solidarity, and resistance. From early Sikh migration to the American West Coast, to Muslim identity in a post 9/11 world, how can South Asian American stories be read as symbolic of the American experience of gender, class, religion, and ethnicity more broadly? Students will hone their skills in reading primary materials, analyzing them within context, writing persuasively, and speaking clearly.
Instructors: Sadaf Jaffer
Studies in the English Novel: Surprised by Passion
This course explores modern novels of erotic and sentimental education.
Instructors: Maria A. DiBattista
Studies in the English Novel: Surprised by Passion
This course explores modern novels of erotic and sentimental education.
Instructors: Maria A. DiBattista
The Contemporary
What does it mean to be contemporary? How does one truly inhabit the present? Through theoretical texts and examples in literature and film, this course explores the ways in which thinkers, writers, and filmmakers have crafted themselves as agents of actualité. Topics covered include: presentism, littérature engagée, culture critique, the tug-of-war between history and the future, the phenomenology of the now, the personal and collective steering of the present toward a particular course, and the genres best suited to register the contemporary (novel, journalistic writing, documentary, essay, journal).
Instructors: Christy Nicole Wampole

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