Courses

Fall 2020

Topics in Greek Literature: Jason and Medea: Argonautica 3
This course focuses on Book 3 of the Argonautica by Apollonius of Rhodes: Jason arrives in Colchis, Medea falls in love with him and decides to help him retrieve the Golden Fleece. Students will gain an insight into the development of epic in the Hellenistic period. They will need to read selections from Homer, Sappho, Pindar and Euripides in translation, and consider Apollonius as a reader and scholar as well as a poet. The course will also investigate ancient ideas about love in its emotional, moral and physical impact.
Instructors: Johannes Haubold
Topics in Greek Literature: Jason and Medea: Argonautica 3
This course focuses on Book 3 of the Argonautica by Apollonius of Rhodes: Jason arrives in Colchis, Medea falls in love with him and decides to help him retrieve the Golden Fleece. Students will gain an insight into the development of epic in the Hellenistic period. They will need to read selections from Homer, Sappho, Pindar and Euripides in translation, and consider Apollonius as a reader and scholar as well as a poet. The course will also investigate ancient ideas about love in its emotional, moral and physical impact.
Instructors: Johannes Haubold
Topics in Hindi-Urdu: Art and Practice of Translation
The course will focus on topics and issues related to literary translation, from Urdu into Hindi, Hindi into Urdu, as well as the translation of Hindi/Urdu literary works into English and from English into Hindi/Urdu. Readings will address issues of theory and practice, as well as selected literary works and their translations. Includes student translation workshops.
Instructors: Robert Lowell Phillips
Topics in Hindi-Urdu: Art and Practice of Translation
The course will focus on topics and issues related to literary translation, from Urdu into Hindi, Hindi into Urdu, as well as the translation of Hindi/Urdu literary works into English and from English into Hindi/Urdu. Readings will address issues of theory and practice, as well as selected literary works and their translations. Includes student translation workshops.
Instructors: Robert Lowell Phillips
Topics in Literature and Ethics: Imagining Human Rights
This course is an invitation for us to think about literature as an ethical and political project, one that raises enduring questions about the uniqueness of the human being, the relation of the self to the other, and the possibility of human understanding across cultural, ethnic, racial and national boundaries. Moving across different periods and traditions, the course will consider how literature, film, and photography have played a crucial role in establishing the meaning of human rights and of enriching our understanding of what it means to be a human being entitled to freedom, life, and liberty.
Instructors: Simon Eliud Gikandi
Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Mimetic Faculties
A seminar on ideas of the "mimetic faculty," as Walter Benjamin defined it: the capacity to perceive similarities and the "compulsion to become similar." Through close study of selected ancient, medieval and modern accounts of imitation, particularly in language and literature, we explore some of the promises and perils of becoming alike. Topics to be discussed include simile and likeness; the poetic syllogism; animal mimicry; ancient divinatory practices and their modern legacies; play; gesture; onomatopoeia; translation; homophony.
Instructors: Daniel Heller-Roazen
Topics in Literature and Philosophy: Mimetic Faculties
A seminar on ideas of the "mimetic faculty," as Walter Benjamin defined it: the capacity to perceive similarities and the "compulsion to become similar." Through close study of selected ancient, medieval and modern accounts of imitation, particularly in language and literature, we explore some of the promises and perils of becoming alike. Topics to be discussed include simile and likeness; the poetic syllogism; animal mimicry; ancient divinatory practices and their modern legacies; play; gesture; onomatopoeia; translation; homophony.
Instructors: Daniel Heller-Roazen
Topics in the History of Modern Syria: Ba`thist Syria - Film, Literature, Power
This seminar explores cultural production in Ba`thist Syria (1963 - present) - its conditions of creation, circulation, and reception - within a broad historical and theoretical framework. The course aims to contextualize and comment upon ongoing discussions surrounding modern and contemporary Syria through an introduction to historical debates in the scholarly literature on politics, aesthetics, and culture. All readings (and most films) are in English, although those with interests and abilities in other related languages (French, Arabic, Russian, German, Hebrew, etc.) will be encouraged to indulge them.
Instructors: Max David Weiss
Translation, Migration, Culture
This course will explore the crucial connections between migration, language, and translation. Drawing on texts from a range of genres and disciplines - from memoir and fiction to scholarly work in translation studies, migration studies, political science, anthropology, and sociology - we will focus on how language and translation affect the lives of those who move through and settle in other cultures, and how, in turn, human mobility affects language and modes of belonging.
Instructors: Karen Renee Emmerich
Translation, Migration, Culture
This course will explore the crucial connections between migration, language, and translation. Drawing on texts from a range of genres and disciplines - from memoir and fiction to scholarly work in translation studies, migration studies, political science, anthropology, and sociology - we will focus on how language and translation affect the lives of those who move through and settle in other cultures, and how, in turn, human mobility affects language and modes of belonging.
Instructors: Karen Renee Emmerich

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