Elise Wang

Email Address: 
elisew@princeton.edu

Elise Wang

Elise Wang

Elise Wang (MSt., Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, A.B. summa cum laude, Harvard University) works on late medieval English literature and history, with a focus on religious literature and natural philosophy. Her interests include the history and philosophy of punishment, theories of exchange in penitential literature and agricultural treatises, and the development of quantification in natural philosophy and medieval mathematics. Her dissertation, funded by the Charlotte Newcombe Fellowship, is entitled, “Punishment and Proportion: Ethical Measurement in Fourteenth-Century English Literature.” The project explores the literary conversation around the quantification of qualities, which brought legal and penitential theories of exchange together with scientific measurement practices to both make sense of and prescribe the social order of their world. This project has been previously supported by the University Center for Human Values Prize Fellowship and the Department of Religion Graduate Fellows Program, among others. She is also working on a second project on early translations of devotional literature at the edges of Christendom.

Elise is also a founding editor of Princeton’s journal of literary translation, Inventory, and a co-founder of the Prison Teaching Initiative. She has served as the organizer of Princeton’s Medieval Colloquium, Works-in-Progress Colloquium, and the Department of English’s medieval lecture series. Before joining the Department of Comparative Literature, she worked in law offices, including as an immigration aide for Senator Barack Obama in Chicago.

Recent teaching

Assistant in Instruction, Princeton University

2016                Clues, Evidence, Detection: Law Stories, Dept of Comparative Literature

2014                England from the Wars of the Roses to the Glorious Revolution, Dept of History

Adjunct Professor, Prison Teaching Initiative, Garden State Correctional Facility (accredited by Mercer County Community College)

2014                English 204: World Literature II: American Lit from 1850-1950, 1 section

2012-2013       English 024: Developmental Composition, 3 sections

Recent invited talks and conference presentations

2016    “Doubling and the Creation of the Female Devotional Self in Late Medieval England,” paper for sponsored session at International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo

2016    “An Introduction to Theories of Punishment,” invited lecture at University of Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina

2015    “The Mathematics of Punishment,” presentation for graduate/faculty seminar at the Princeton University Center for Human Values


2014    “Haukyn and the Measurement of recte vivendi in Piers Plowman,” paper at International Congress of Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo


2014    “’Dysmas my brother bisoughte thee of grace’: The economies of punishment in Piers Plowman,” Works-in-Progress presentation, Princeton Department of Comparative Literature